GRX 600 vs 800 levers

Anyone here used both and have a convincing argument for buying 800? Its not available right now but 600 is. Im worried if i wait for the 800, they never come and i miss out on getting 600 when its available. My wife has 600 and her stuff seams to work flawlessly. I keep my equipment so spending a bit more up front tends to be the way i go as i often have it until it wears out.

I believe that 800 brakes have the servo wave feature and bite point adjust but 600 has neither. I could be wrong. There will be a very marginal weight penalty with the 600s.

My wife’s gravel bike has 600 and the brakes are excellent. 800 might be better but would you notice? I’m not sure I would, but I’m light and a fairly conservative descender off road.

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I don’t think you’d notice the difference. And you don’t higher end parts than your wife.

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Isn’t it only the Di2 levers that have the different brake modulation???

I think the 600 levers lose out on a tiny chrome strip on the top of the lever vs the 800.

It’s up to you if this is more aesthetically pleasing or not.

I’ve a set of the 600s and am very happy with their fit and function.

The GRX 800 levers are basically Ultegra bodies w/ a slightly different blade shape for the brake lever.

While I haven’t actually gripped a 600 lever, given the above, I’d be willing to bet that the 600 levers are 105 bodies with a reworked lever blade.

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So what’s the actual difference between 105 and ultegra?

Honestly, not much these days, IMO…I have 105 mechanical on my backup / travel bike and a mix of GRX 800 (left side) and Ultegra (right side) on my gravel bike. (That is how I know the lever bodies are essentially the same).

While I don’t have a lot of miles on the 105 stuff yet (bike was new in late May), they are very, very similar to my Ultegra stuff. Obviously some minor weight differences, but if I was blindfolded, I couldn’t tell the 105 from the mechanical, in either shape or function.

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On the second ten-speed generation (6700 / 5700), 105 FD was a bit soft, and less precise than Ultegra. Ultegra brakes were also a bit stiffer and felt more controlled. But that was already minor.

Now I assume the difference is even less.

About ÂŁ400 and about 300g.

Function? Minimal to no difference.

Chorus and Record is the same (except the fixings on Chorus rim brakes rust, while Record ones don’t).

This is another reason for the drive towards electronic: the mechanical gruppos had just got too similar.

Anyone here have the 800 with the servo wave? I have the mtb equivalent and have always been curious if that is what causes the wandering bite point xt brakes are famous for? I’d go 600 if it avoided the wandering bite.

Just out of interest, is there anywhere that one can actually purchase GRX800 components. There is very little available.

I don’t know about that….electronic shifting is identical between groups, except for not programming in some functionality on the lowest end groups….but that is a manufacturer’s choice, not a price issue.

In Australia, pretty much no. I ended up buying a pair of GRX810 levers and the new Ultegra Disc brake calipers from Bike24 in Germany at a very good price. I had to get them sent via a relative in Holland though as Bike24 cant ship Shimano direct to Australia.

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I’m pretty much in the same boat. I tried ordering what would amount to a grouppo from Bikeinn and Chainreaction and I couldn’t piece together a crank, brakes, shifters.

Is there any word on when parts might be available in quantity from Shimano? Sorry, I’m not up to date on supply chain news.

Material and therefore weight.

Carbon lever blades on Ultegra, alloy on 105.

GRX800 has the servo and more fine tuned ability to adjust lever distance. First I actually don’t like, second I find quite important.

Just to make matters even more interesting - Shimano released a limited edition GRX 800 - they seem to assume that the marked needed a little more pull in the gravel segment…:see_no_evil: