How to read the Tire wear indicators?

One of my tire wear indicators is more worn off than the other. The difference is a lot.

How do I read it? One says I have to soon replace whereas other looks fresh. Is this how they were designed to wear off?

That tyre has plenty of life,
You can still see the centre line. I suspect you would have skidded the tyre where the more worn indicator is. Otherwise it’s a manufacturing error as they typically wear at the same rate.

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Try doing your regular loop ride, but this time clockwise.

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Surprising my regular loop is indeed clockwise. :laughing:

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As an aside, on my Continentals I’ve never had my tire wear indicator wear down before the casing came apart somewhere. I can see through to the tube, and the TWI is saying “Tis but a flesh wound!”

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Disregard inconsistencies between the two markers… the intent is that once you can no longer see any marker, the tire needs replacing so basically just refer to whichever lasts longer.

As someone else said though, I’ve never managed to actually wear down through the indicator completely before something else ripped the carcass enough to require a new tire so I wouldn’t worry too much about it.

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Hi.
My experience has been that on continental tyres one indicator is always set deeper in than the other. You could simply buy a spare tyre when the first indicator appears then check more regularly the second indicator.

With continentals specifically the GP4000 SII I found when one indicator was gone I tended to replace the tyre soon after as the transition from the top of the tyre to the shoulder was very vicious and unsettling when riding

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Thanks this makes a lot of sense to me as I notice this trend in all of my bike tires. I.e. two bikes thus 4 tires. Also noticed the same experience of tire suddenly giving way as soon as lean more.